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Trade Show and Event Tips

Trade Show exhibiting is all about marketing your products or services at expositions, conferences, and trade shows. However, if you are new to exhibit or event marketing, you will be faced with more questions than answers: What size booth do I need? How much should I budget for show expenses? What the heck is freight drayage?

The following articles explore a wide range of trade show topics, such as Exhibit Marketing, Flooring Choices, and Booth Etiquette. Want to know more? Give us a call or send us an email. Whether you are a trade show novice or a trade show warrior, we look forward to turning your next event -- into an EVENT!

Trade show Exhibit Tips,  Tricks &  Knowledge

TIt's Crazy! And It's Easy to Fix.

People do really dumb stuff at trade shows. Consistently dumb stuff. Anyone who participates in trade shows could write a book on what they've seen. Pre-show marketing and post-show leads alone would cover several hundred pages.

So, let's ignore those and concentrate on the easy, quick fixes, the ones you can change now. The ones you can implement before your next show.

Senior Management

Bring them . . . but not all of them. Bring the President and the CEO, assuming they are personable and knowledgeable. Don't bring them if they love to hear themselves talk. Don't bring the CFO, the COO, or anyone who couldn't charm a goldfish into a fishbowl. Clients want to talk to senior management. And their presence demonstrates that your company is serious about the show. You may not agree, but in today's business-centric world, the CEO and President are Rock Stars to your audience.

This rule obviously doesn't apply if you do 80 shows a year. Pick the 3 or 4 most crucial and have the "chiefs" there. Tip: It's much easier to get a trade show marketing budget approved if senior management participates.

Come Late. Leave Early

Most shows allow you to enter the show hall early. This gives you time to organize the booth and make any last minute changes. More importantly, it's the ideal time to walk the show, see industry trends, and get a better sense of what your competitors are showing. If possible, bring a colleague. That way you can compare notes.

It's also a great time to talk to the other early birds. There are fewer distractions, and you're more likely to have a casual, informative conversation. Staying late has similar advantages. Not surprisingly, tired exhibitors can be very revealing at the end of the day.

That said . . . adhere to the formal and informal rules of the trade show floor. Don't do anything you wouldn't want a competitor to do in your booth.

Ignore the Competition

Many companies are arrogant about their competitors. They see themselves as "the leaders," so what could they possibly learn? The answer is -- a lot. Even knowing that you are still the leader is valuable when targeting new markets and developing your marketing strategy.

And, unless your company prohibits it, don't be afraid to introduce yourself. Friendliness is not a crime. You may be surprised at what you'll discover, and a friendly competitor has been known to send business your direction if the client doesn't fit their model. Tip: Beware of the red herring. Sometimes competitors can be sneaky smart about their sales, trends, and products. 

Ignore Your Customers

It happens. It's human nature. We feel like we don't have to spend as much time with existing customers since we know them. However, your customers come to trade shows to learn about new products, services, and companies. They also come to mingle with colleagues, meet new people, and share challenges. They want to feel valued.

If good customer says, "I was at the show, but --

a) You were so busy no one was available,

b) I was there but just never made it to your booth, or

c) Spoke to Bob (or Jane or Homer) and they said there's nothing new happening"

Then, you have a problem. A correctable problem but a problem.

Ignore the Social Events

As much as we want to pretend otherwise, trade shows are business in a semi-social setting. The planned social events, such as the evening gala, meet-and-greet events, award ceremonies, and receptions are still business functions. Make it worthwhile. It's your chance to meet new people, chat with industry colleagues, bond with existing customers, and find new customers.

Can it be hard, especially if you are a wallflower? Yes . . . but . . . wallflowers have an advantage. They are great listeners, and in any large room, the ratio of talkers to listeners is about 95:1. Ask the right question (or often any question) and the rest of the night is on auto-pilot.

Tip:  For anyone under 30, Social Media ≠ Social Events. And yes, you do have to talk to people. You can't just text them.

Rely on Memory

Unless you're Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory, your memory is flawed, hopelessly flawed. On Day 1, you will recall every single conversation. By Day 3, an important client will remind you that you spoke for 30 minutes about a critical new project on Day 1.

Use whatever works -- paper, tablet, business cards with notes, digital recorder, etc. Yes, it's better if everyone in the booth uses a similar system, but it's even better if everyone takes notes that can be reconstructed at the end of the day or the end of the show. Tip: Don't let "Joe" leave the booth at the end of the day without emptying his pockets. Otherwise, those notes and business cards will be trash can casualties or unreadable smudges by next week.

Please share your "quick fixes." View it as volunteer community service for the less fortunate who see neither the forest nor the trees when it comes to trade shows. Don't make me stand on the corner ringing a bell for the clueless. They can be saved!

For more information about trade show or event marketing, give us a call or Contact Us. We welcome the opportunity to assist you with your next event. ype your paragraph here.